Bible Courses


BI101 Bible Study Methods

This introductory course covers foundational issues of biblical hermeneutics (the art and science of interpretation).  Its intent is to develop competency in biblical interpretation for both the personal and public use of the Scriptures (3 credit hours).


BI102 OLD TESTAMENT LITERATURE

This course is a general survey of the Old Testament. The historical background, thematic development, and doctrinal contribution of each book are considered in a chronological sequence through the period of Old Testament history. The arguments and purposes of each book are reviewed. The Old Testament section introduces the student to historical, legal, poetical, and prophetical literature that was written by the Jewish people between 1500 B.C.--A.D. 400. Major theological and philosophical genres which provide continuity to this literature are surveyed (3 credit hours).


BI103 NEW TESTAMENT LITERATURE

This course is a general survey of the New Testament. The historical background, thematic development, and doctrinal contribution of each book are considered in a chronological sequence through the period of New Testament history. The arguments and purposes of each book are reviewed. New Testament Survey introduces the student to gospel, historical, epistolary, and apocalyptic literature of the first century. The background and formation of the New Testament is also examined. In addition there is a consideration of the progressive development of biblical theology through each book (3 credit hours).


BI104 GENESIS

 The book of Genesis tells the story of the origins of the people of God, and the people’s account of God’s mysterious presence to create, save, call and guide. Learning to read Genesis is a training ground for reading God’s presence in our lives and times. The instructor will spend the first six lectures on Genesis 1-11. This will be followed by segments on the Abraham, Jacob and Joseph cycles. Special emphasis will be placed on developing an approach to the Scriptures that is intellectually responsible and contemplative while at the same time being engaged with the world outside the comfortable confines of church and academy. Required readings will help students learn to integrate careful exegesis, contemplative reading and “street reading”. The course is designed to provide knowledge, skills and experience that will help the student better do the necessary work to prepare for sermons, Bible studies and their own personal study (3 credit hours).


BI201 SYNOPTIC GOSPELS

This course examines the archaeology, history, geography, religions, cultures and philosophies of the second temple period of Palestine, 70 B.C. -- A.D. 70. Special attention focuses on the life of Jesus, the Herodian dynasty and Pontius Pilate. The Jewish sects of the Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes and Zealots are examined and the impact of these sects on the religious life of this period. The philosophies of Plato, Aristotle, Stoics, Epicureans and Proto-Gnostics are explained and how these shaped the mindset of Palestinian culture. The geography and topography of Palestine are discussed and viewed in order to help interpret the teachings of Jesus Christ in their cultural setting (3 credit hours).


BI202 ROMANS

A study of Romans from a cultural, historical and grammatical perspective. The study will emphasize the arguments and purposes of each epistle as well as the practical teaching. (3 credit hours).


BI203 GENERAL EPISTLES

A study of the General Epistles from a cultural, historical and grammatical perspective. The study will emphasize the arguments and purposes of each epistle as well as the practical teaching. (3 credit hours).


BI204 DANIEL AND REVELATION

This class focuses on a detailed exegesis of Daniel and Revelation. The argument, complements, and purposes of these books are fully developed. Introductory issues such as: 1) form and composition, 2) structure, 3) origin and date, 4) authorship, and 5) recipient are discussed. A survey of the biblical theology is also presented. This class presents the:1) characteristics or motifs of apocalyptic 2) various hermeneutical approaches 5) the chronological and sequential structure of the apocalypse of John and 4) various theological approaches (3 credit hours).


BI301 PAULINE EPISTLES

An analysis of the Pauline corpus of epistles. Particular attention is given to the historical and cultural background of the epistles. The arguments, purposes and theology of the book are developed. A detailed exegetical analysis is presented from a grammatical- historical-literary hermeneutic (3 credit hours).


BI302 OLD TESTAMENT PROPHETS

An overview of the Ancient Near Eastern history with particular focus on Israel from the divided monarchy through the captivities, exile and restoration. The course will examine the office and function of the prophet and the background factors for interpreting prophetic material.

The arguments, complements, and purposes of the prophets are fully developed. Introductory issues such as: 1) form and composition, 2) structure, 3) origin and date,
4) authorship, and 5) recipient are discussed. A survey of the biblical theology is also presented.

The prophets are examined in the light of their role as covenant enforcers. The enforcement of the Abrahamic, Mosaic, Davidic, Palestinian, Levitical and Noahic covenants is demonstrated as a major responsibility of the ministry of the prophets (3 credit hours).


BI401 ADVANCE HERMENEUTICS

This is an advance study of the field of hermeneutics. The course will examine current theories of translation, exegesis and application of the biblical text.


BT401 BIBLICAL THEOLOGY OF THE OLD TESTAMENT

A systematic and biblical study of the revelation of God through the religion, life and history of Israel as contained within the canonical Old Testament. Special attention is given to matters of the chronological development of biblical theology.

Old Testament Biblical Theology examines the rise and decline of the nation of Israel from 2200--400 B.C. The geographical setting of Palestine is discussed in order to demonstrate its importance on the history of Israel. The history of Egypt, Assyria, Babylonia, Media-Persia and other Near Eastern nations is reviewed so as to appreciate their influence on the biblical theological development of the Old Testament, as Yahweh discloses His will to His people within the various political periods of Israel's history. This theological revelation focuses on the law, covenants, promises and prophetic messages (3 credit hours).


BT402 BIBLICAL THEOLOGY OF THE NEW TESTAMENT

The course will review the diversity and unity of the messages of the various books of the New Testament. Attention is given to the presuppositions and methods of New Testament theology. The messages of the individual authors are discussed, and an effort is made to synthesize these messages into a unified statement of the foundational theology of the Church (3 credit hours).